John Larroquette speaker for NCADD Spring Luncheon

John Larroquette,now appearing on Broadway in “How To Succeed In Business”,will be the keynote speaker at the National Council for Alcohol and Drug Dependency on April 28th at the University Club in NYC.Since John Larroquette’s recovery in 1982 he has spent much of his time sharing his story so that others might realize there is a way out of the bottle and into life.Larroquette still gives thanks everyday for the life he was given a chance to reclaim, particularly when so many others never see a way out of their disease and succumb to it in one way or another.
Read More ...

Will Sing for Health Care, Parade Magazine 4/17/11

No insurance? No problem – if you’re an artist in New York City. An innovative program in Brooklyn lets creative types trade their skills for medical services. Rebecca Webber, author of “Will Sing For Health Care,” describes the program that more than 600 artists have used to gain health care assistance.  To qualify, you must live in New York City, lack health insurance, and be able to prove that your income comes from your art. Rebecca further writes that, “at a time when the future of federal health-care reform is uncertain and 50 million Americans are uninsured, this New York City initiative is a creative way to help the creative class afford treatment.”  Read More.
Read More ...

CNN: Dr. Aaron Carroll says “Ryan’s plan a step — but in wrong direction”

In the April 8th CNN Opinion piece Dr. Aaron Carroll states that Rep. Paul Ryan deserves credit for proposing plan, but it doesn’t add up; and that Ryan’s claims that plan would cut unemployment to 4% by 2015 an unbelievable figure.  Further Carroll says Medicare voucher plan will end up costing seniors; Medicaid cuts will hurt old, poor; and Counter-proposals should include cutting fraud, letting Bush-era tax cuts expire.  Read More

 
Read More ...

New England Journal of Medicine-Dr. Aaron Carroll

In a newly released article in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Aaron Carroll discusses “Our Flawed but Beneficial Medicaid Program.” Many U.S. governors are proposing or implementing deep cuts to their states’ Medicaid programs to address budget shortfalls, and some are calling for Medicaid to be converted to a block-grant program. Some commentators defend such policy retrenchment by claiming that Medicaid coverage fails to improve health outcomes — indeed, that its beneficiaries may have worse health outcomes than patients with no insurance at all. To make that case, these commentators have creatively interpreted observational studies that have examined clinical outcomes associated with particular medical interventions according to the patient’s insurance type — Medicaid, Medicare, private coverage, or none — and found that outcomes for Medicaid patients are worse than those for uninsured patients.
Read More ...